Preview
Far Cry New Dawn

Far Cry New Dawn

Pretty In Pink
by Imran Khan on Jan 23, 2019 at 11:00 AM
Publisher: Ubisoft
Developer: Ubisoft Montreal
Release:
Rating: Mature
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

When Far Cry 5 concluded last year, players around the world were left scratching their heads over the ending. The nuclear apocalypse came crashing down on the world and Hope County was just another scorch mark on the planet. Seventeen years later, the world has begun to heal from the scars left by the nuclear winter left by the bombs. Where there is healing and prosperity, however, there will be people who want to take those things for themselves. Once again, Hope County is the stage for another major battle in the Far Cry universe in New Dawn.

It’s not unfair to say that New Dawn is built on the blocks of Far Cry 5 in the way that previous non-mainline Far Cry titles were built using the foundations of their predecessors. New Dawn hopes to expand around the periphery of what Far Cry 5 has already established by resuming life in Hope County in a drastically different context. Whereas its progenitor focused on liberating the small Montana county from a religious cult, New Dawn is about building something new from its tattered remains.

A roving band of brigands led by twins Mickey and Lou have been traveling across the United States looking for resources to take for their own. After they arrive in Hope County, the survivors of the nuclear blast and their new generation of children find themselves ill-equipped to fight back. They have, however, heard tell of a freedom fighter named Rush that has been following Mickey and Lou and trying to fight them off. As Rush’s group arrives in Hope County, their train explodes, killing most of Rush’s force and stranding the player character until he or she is picked up by Hope County’s minuscule resistance force.

New Dawn is based around that resistance base, progressing alongside the game’s story. The more the base is worked on with resources, new partners, and story missions finished, the more it levels up, opening up new resources, partners, and story missions. Ubisoft has taken the criticism of Far Cry 5’s structure, repeatedly imprisoning players by different villains to progress the story, and tweaked it to be paced better with less repetition.

One way the game plans to vary things up is through Expeditions. After giving the base’s helicopter pilot enough resources, you open up the ability to leave Hope County and travel to other places the rival gang has taken over. Taking the helicopter to Florida, somehow, brings you to an abandoned military ship filled with enemies. Your pilot drops you off, you can switch your weapons before he leaves, and he picks you up when your mission objective is over. In all the expeditions I played, every objective was simply to find a bag in enemy territory, make it to the helicopter landing spot before the bag’s GPS activates, and fight off enemies until the helicopter lands.

Aesthetically, the new Far Cry is divergent from a lot of post-apocalyptic games. The game is colorful, lush, and has more than a game’s normal share of pink everywhere. Ubisoft is keen to point out that they consulted with scientists working for the U.S. government on the accuracy of this look, stating that the greenery and pink flowers are a result the phenomenon called “super bloom” that kicks into high-gear as the planet heals.

Far Cry New Dawn looks like it will be a lot of what Far Cry 5 already started, which is also firmly rooted in what Far Cry has been for several games now. Fans who are eager to find out how the end of Far Cry 5 affected the world, including what became of The Father, will find their answers in Far Cry New Dawn. Everyone who is eager for more of the tried-and-true Far Cry formula will hopefully find what they’re looking for when New Dawn releases on February 15.