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Did we play the same game?

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  • I find myself asking that question only once when I read the review from Reiner.  It was from the following paragraph below.  I have never been one to actually write responses, I just generally read what other people say and keep going not putting my personal input; however, I really can't stop myself.

    "I was left speechless at the end of this story. I won’t divulge the feeling that washed over me during the final sequence, but I absolutely love how it concludes. Most of the major plot points and character side stories – even those harking back to Mass Effect 1 – resolve. Some of these characters feel like old friends or family members, and it’s remarkable how much emotion these fictional beings evoke. I was sad to leave them behind, but satisfied since I had no unanswered questions." (From Mass Effect 3 review)

    I was left speechless too, for entirely different reasons.  I enjoyed this game and many aspects of the game.  I don't think it is a bad game.  I do think it deserves some praise for what it brings to the table.  I enjoy the multi-player and the game play is awesome... all the way... until the ending.  What choice did you have?  What color explosions you would get to see.  What exactly gets resolved? **SPOILERS** You send the world to a galactic dark age and have no idea what even happened to Earth or your remaining crew mates.  If you have your galactic score high enough you get to see Shepard take a breath for one whole second!  I had a lot more questions when I saw the ending to this game.  Nothing was resolved.  A mess relay explosion could have potentially destroyed Earth for all I know. 

    Now the question: Is the ending of the video game enough to warrant a negative review?  Well according to the rating system of GI, a 10 is: "Outstanding.  A truly elite title that is nearly perfect in every way.  This score is given out rarely and indicates a game that cannot be missed."  (Game Informer Review break down table)  If a game does not have a satisfying conclusion or even feel like an ending, then I would assume that it isn't even nearly perfect.  Maybe if it was rated a 9 something I wouldn't have cared so much (Just short of gaming nirvana would make more sense to me).  I know, who really cares about what I have to say.  However, if you step away from this forum and check out the Bioware forums, you find a lot of people feel the same way I do.

    Reiner, if you believed honestly that this was a good ending then we just have contrasting opinions; however, I don't think that is the case.  I just argued with a good friend of mine that some reviewers from the video game industry is 'bought' out; however, I disagreed with her saying that Game Informer wasn't like that.  I really can't say that with confidence any more.

  • Reiner reviewed a game, not a story.  That includes gameplay, which ME3 delivered in truckloads, you have to remember that.  The only problem with the gameplay at ALL has to be the sticky-button (space bar for me as I am using PC, for PS3 it's the X button) that makes you take cover/roll and the game has a problem with the camera and context of the sticky-button.

    But yea I definitely think other than the terribad ending (it was terribad from a storytelling standpoint; it's too hard to defend against that) the game was fun.  Multiple fleshed out levels and equipment options; addresses pretty much all crew members and even has a decent storypoint stemming from different ME1/ME2 playthroughs (If you killed Wrex in ME1, you're stuck with Wreave and a potentially different storytelling option then!) so yea the game REALLY earns a 10/10 from me despite the ending.  I'm just happy that OTHER THAN THE ENDING it's hard to complain about anything else, considering what ME3 is as a game franchise goes.

  • whether or not you "liked" the ending is irrelevant, it's still filled with plot holes big enough to drive am 18-wheeler through.

  • I liked most of what was actually IN the ending, it just doesn't include enough information. People talk about plot holes, but plot holes are things that lack any reasonable explanation within the narrative. The only thing for that is that your squad members teleport from where you were all rushing the beam to the Normandy when it crash-lands on that planet. What the Catalyst says is completely consistent with everything else in ME3, and is all but directly stated by the Reaper on Rannoch. It's consistent with Harbinger's occasional ranting about the Reapers being our "salvation through destruction." It doesn't completely fit with the tone of the conversation with Sovereign in ME1, but he doesn't actually tell you anything at all, and even claims something that's absolutely impossible (that the Reapers have no origin).

    The ending doesn't contradict established lore. If they'd bothered to tell us what the *** happens to our squadmates and all of the species that you dealt with, I think there'd be a lot less whiners out there.  That's all I really want. I'd be pissed if they actually took out what's there, but it'd be nice if they added some extra dialogue with the Catalyst, gave some differentiation between the three decisions, and generally bothered to actually tell us what happened after the decision was made.

    Supposedly, someone at Bioware said that stuff wasn't included because they didn't know there would be such demand for it. How the *** does THAT work?

  • I'm guessing you could not get the Quarians and the Geth to work together because it completely disproves what the star brat and the reapers say.  The plot holes are lacking in any reasonable explanation and it is inexcusable for Bioware to have tried to have passed this off as a quality ending.

    And it does contradict established lore.  Destruction of a Mass Relay leads to a supernova like explosion, and it will destroy the system that the relay is found in.  This comes straight from the Arrival DLC and Bioware had to know they were commiting a canonical error.

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