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Proving That Not All Reboots Are Just Cash Ins


  When I first heard they were rebooting the Tomb Raider franchise I remember feeling excited but I slightly cringed initially as well.  Tomb Raider holds a very special place amongst gaming nostalgia for me, Tomb Raider 2 was the first game I got for my PS1, way back in the day.  In fact the first thing I remember playing on my playstation was the demo of Tomb Raider 2 that came on the playstation underground demo disc that boxed with the PS1.  But there have been quite a few Tomb Raider projects announced and released since then and not many aside from The Guardian of Light of have lived up to my expectations of how great I remember Tomb Raider being.   Now of course that same game wouldn't live up to my expectations today, part of how I remember it was shaped largely by the emergence of new technology in the gaming industry and the fact when I was younger, I had never really played another game quite like that so it was a breath of fresh air.  A new adventure so to say.  But all nostalgia aside, the game goes above and beyond living up to all the expectations I'd set for it.   While this may seem trivial to many gamers,  one of my biggest hopes upon the announcement of the new Tomb Raider title would be that it would receive  a mature rating.  Why you might ask?  I just simply felt the world Laura lived in was more gritty, and raw than it had previously been portrayed as being.   Laura's struggle is one for survival, the game should be graphic as to better immerse the player in her world by providing more realistic consequences when she makes a mistake.
I also felt it that telling the origin story of a young Laura Croft was the best way to go, in doing so it was easier for the development team to start with a clean slate.  But this also allowed for the chance to tell a much more gritty story of what made Laura into the hardened adventurer she is.  A lot of people have criticized the fact Laura's story is supposed to be much more emotional and make you invested in the character by her hesitation to kill, a loss of innocence so to speak.  However with that being said there were parts in the game where Laura was forced to take rather aggressive approaches with the enemy.  I did not feel this was an issue at all.  The story is one about survival, the ability to adapt and doing what it ever it takes to survive.  And when put in the situation of kill or be killed, we're all going to want to live so we pull the trigger.
Tomb Raider features an amazing story, and awesome character growth.  Control wise, everything feels and controls like it should.  Visually the game is amazing, I personally think this is one of the best looking games we're going to see this console generation.  The music fits the game perfectly and helps to accentuate the mood.  I had a lot of fun with Tomb Raider, over all this is an awesome game and well worth the $60 shelf price, this is a game I have already recommended to many friends.  However my big hesitation and what kept me from giving it a perfect score was the multi player.  I personally didn't think Tomb Raider really needed multiplayer features, but the trend in games seems to be if your game doesn't have multiplayer its not a worth while game.  The multiplayer aspect of the game seems largely tacked on, I found it to be rather dull.  And as of right now there are now plans for single player DLC but all DLC is currently supposed to be focused on a lackluster multiplayer that just isn't going to be able to compete and offer the same thrills as the big 3, Battlefield, CoD, and Halo.   I felt that the decision to also have multiplayer achievements and trophies was poor choice seeing as how dull it is, people aren't simply going to want to play it, so the people who try to conquer and 1k games are going to have a much more difficult time with this one.  But over all Tomb Raider is an awesome product and in my humble opinion easily in the running for game of the year.

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