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An Expansion That Doesn't Need To Exist

Crysis 3 doesn't need to exist. Crysis 2 provided a satisfactory end to the original story arc. Crysis 3 more or less came out of nowhere and feels like a tacked on excuse to jump back into the Crysis universe for a few hours. It also definitively re-satisfies said story arc. There are some plot pieces that raise more questions than they answer and a twist that most should see coming that then turns into an out of place lovers subplot, but for the most part the story is entertaining. I just feel that it didn't need to be told and that the reasoning behind Prophet's presence (yes, the original Prophet, forget about Alcatraz) is extremely contrived.

For the five hours (six is being generous and I stopped often to sightsee) that you'll spend saving an overgrown New York, you'll be awed by magnificent views and wield familiar weapons. The graphics are beautiful. Even on 360 (my console of choice), Crysis 3 puts most other games to shame. Every sight is worth taking in and a great amount of detail went into every aspect. The weapons are more of the same from Crysis 2 (which isn't a bad thing) with the addition of the Ceph arsenal. The Cell weapons can be fully customized, but the Ceph weapons are one-offs that feel ripped from Halo. There are also a couple of vehicle segments that reminded me of the sand buggy sequences from Half Life 2 except this one handles terribly and seems disproportional to the rest of the world when inside it. The game is fairly linear. I disagree with Bertz's statement that there are multiple objectives that you can tackle in any order you please. It's more like there are inconsequential optional objectives that you can go a few meters out of your way for. There are multiple ways to tackle any objective, but I never got the feeling that I was exploring a massive area like I did with Crysis 2. Also be prepared for two back-to-back, out-of-place boss fights.

One segment that still stands out in my mind that I think deserves some praise and recognition is near the start. Players are tasked with taking out a defensive tower surrounded by ruins and tall grass. Within the tall grass are Ceph and they move and hunt like the velociraptors in Jurassic Park. I felt pangs of fear and anxiety in dealing with those foes. That whole segment made me long for a Jurassic park game, because that's what I felt like I was playing. Near the end while making a final assault on a Cell base, I longed for a Mass Effect FPS with Crysis graphics, because I felt like I was caught in the crosshairs between Cerebrus and Reaper forces. Crysis 3 contains a lot of cool moments, but I found myself wondering what the point of Crysis 3 is (it existing, I understood my mission objectives) and thought it should go the route of Mass Effect 4, a new direction with pieces of the past. Luckily for Crysis fans, Crysis 4 is underway and is expected to be a radical new direction.

The multiplayer is entertaining for a few rounds, but it wont keep most players returning for more. I believe that Crysis' foundation is in single player and am not giving the multiplayer equal weight in making my review. Let's face it, Crysis is no CoD, Halo or Battlefield. Crysis 3 is an enjoyable and worthwhile experience. I recommend it, especially if you've enjoyed the past entries. Just don't pay sticker price. Redbox it like I did or borrow it from a friend. In a month or so, it'll be going for much cheaper or used. Crysis 3 should have been a downloadable expansion to Crysis 2, not a full sequel. Most of my review may seem negative, but my goal is to bring some issues to light that I feel Bertz overlooked or didn't regard as issues. I agree with the rest of his review and feel that overall, Crysis 3 is a worthwhile gaming experience.

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