The Unfinished Swan - A Finished Wonder - User Reviews - www.GameInformer.com
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The Unfinished Swan - A Finished Wonder

How do you explain this game? I suppose I would say it is a surreal first person adventure? That's the best that I can think of. You play a boy who's mother started a lot of paintings, but never finished any. Then she dies. Kid goes to an orphanage. I know it's sad, and I'm being blunt about it, but hey, how else could we have a trippy dream sequence without some kind of trauma?

 

You enter a dream world of sorts one night, and all you see is white. When you start throwing around black balls of paint, the world forms before your eyes.  The first chapter has you splattering the white with black, creating a beautiful world in the process with everything from statues to frogs. At one point in this chapter, you get to a spot to look back on your creation, able to see where you have traveled.

 

Each chapter has you doing something different, with different ways to interact with the changing world. In one part you throw balls of paint as vines grow towards them, creating various objects through the environment, including different ways to traverse the castle you are currently in. These moments were some of my favorite, as your blue paint would quickly disappear, instead you were left with bright green leaves covering the grounds and buildings. There are a couple parts later on that really mix up the game, completely unexpected and out of left field. I'll let you discover these wonderful moments on your own.

 

 

 

Other than the boy dealing with the passing of his mother, there is another story that is told by large pictures that, when hit with paint, light up and a voice comes across and reads to you the writings on the wall. It tells a fairy tale type story of a king who wants nothing but to make sure he is remembered throughout the ages, only to fail at every attempt. At the very end this is all tied together quite nicely, though not unexpected considering everything.

 

This game contains no combat, barely any platforming, and simple but nicely paced changes in game play. What truly makes this game shine is the sheer imagination at work here. Nothing like it has ever been done, and probably never will. This is the kind of game that there only needs to be one. No sequels, no clones, just this game. Like Journey before it, this is here purely for the emotional trip that it takes you through, ever so peacefully, yet touching on a spot that is often missed, if not ignored completely

Comments
  • That's water that you're throwing in the vine chapter. That's why the vines grow toward it.