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Decent Gaming PC

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  • No, at the beginning of a console generation the systems are sold at a loss.  You will not be able to build a PC with the same performance for the same price.  In 3 years or so probably but in the next 3 months it just wont happen.  Game devs can also get more out of a console in terms of performance since it is a close system with known software on it where they get direct, or darn near it direct hardware access.

    The price of PC gaming is front loaded.  Where as the console makers are willing to take a hit on the hardware knowing they will make it back on the software, that is not the case on PC.  However our software tends to be cheaper by $10 on average, if you wait for sales it can easily be 50% cheaper than consoles.  Over a 6 or 8 year period it adds up to where I spend less gaming on PC than I would on consoles, but you need to have that initial chunk of money to get started.  Having none of the accessories sets you back even more.  A mid ranged 22'-24' monitor will set you back $120-$180, Windows will set you back $80-$120, KB/M will run you $60-$80 for a decent non gaming set $150 for gaming versions, you also need speakers or a headset.

    Also your first post made a common mistake for new PC gamers.  You cant walk in with a budget, and also want ultra settings on a high graphics game.  To hit ultra settings on  a game like BF3, Crysis, Metro 2033, Witcher 2, with a solid 30+fps is not easy.  However near ultra or high end settings is very doable.  You can still max out the details, the resolution, and all that just need to be willing to lower some of the filters and AA.  That is doable on a budget.  Still not overly cheap, because as I said above the cost of PC gaming is front loaded.

    Here is a build where I would start if I was you.  It is about $800 for the hardware, I also tossed on a monitor and a copy of Windows, that brought it up too $1000.  You would still need KB/M and probably a set of speakers or headphones.

    pcpartpicker.com/.../1sB0e

    Building your own is ALMOST ALWAYS your best bet in terms of price.  Though if you are patient and watch sales you can sometimes get some decent deals, especially around Black Friday/Cyber Monday.  Now keep in mind what a lot of the "Gaming PCs" you buy from retailers have a decent CPU and GPU, but then a crap mother board, power supply and case.  Yet if you get it for the right price it can be worth it.  But you need to have some idea what it is you are getting.  

    We're sorta like 7-Eleven. We're not always doing business, but we're always open.

    Steam - palor700   XBL - LooneyPilot   paxgaming.com

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  • I also need a monitor, keyboard, and mouse. I hope I'm not asking for too much.

  • Your best bet would be to build your own,

    For that price you can build a nice PC, check out Newegg for prices on hardware.

  • Better go for custom / assembled computer then branded

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  • So here's another question, would I get a better deal by buying the Xbox One? By this I mean graphically for the price. In other words (sorry for re-phrasing this three times lol) can I get a PC that will run BF4, Titanfall, and all the other upcoming games at equal or better resolution/frame rate for the 542.00 price?

  • No, at the beginning of a console generation the systems are sold at a loss.  You will not be able to build a PC with the same performance for the same price.  In 3 years or so probably but in the next 3 months it just wont happen.  Game devs can also get more out of a console in terms of performance since it is a close system with known software on it where they get direct, or darn near it direct hardware access.

    The price of PC gaming is front loaded.  Where as the console makers are willing to take a hit on the hardware knowing they will make it back on the software, that is not the case on PC.  However our software tends to be cheaper by $10 on average, if you wait for sales it can easily be 50% cheaper than consoles.  Over a 6 or 8 year period it adds up to where I spend less gaming on PC than I would on consoles, but you need to have that initial chunk of money to get started.  Having none of the accessories sets you back even more.  A mid ranged 22'-24' monitor will set you back $120-$180, Windows will set you back $80-$120, KB/M will run you $60-$80 for a decent non gaming set $150 for gaming versions, you also need speakers or a headset.

    Also your first post made a common mistake for new PC gamers.  You cant walk in with a budget, and also want ultra settings on a high graphics game.  To hit ultra settings on  a game like BF3, Crysis, Metro 2033, Witcher 2, with a solid 30+fps is not easy.  However near ultra or high end settings is very doable.  You can still max out the details, the resolution, and all that just need to be willing to lower some of the filters and AA.  That is doable on a budget.  Still not overly cheap, because as I said above the cost of PC gaming is front loaded.

    Here is a build where I would start if I was you.  It is about $800 for the hardware, I also tossed on a monitor and a copy of Windows, that brought it up too $1000.  You would still need KB/M and probably a set of speakers or headphones.

    pcpartpicker.com/.../1sB0e

    Building your own is ALMOST ALWAYS your best bet in terms of price.  Though if you are patient and watch sales you can sometimes get some decent deals, especially around Black Friday/Cyber Monday.  Now keep in mind what a lot of the "Gaming PCs" you buy from retailers have a decent CPU and GPU, but then a crap mother board, power supply and case.  Yet if you get it for the right price it can be worth it.  But you need to have some idea what it is you are getting.  

    We're sorta like 7-Eleven. We're not always doing business, but we're always open.

    Steam - palor700   XBL - LooneyPilot   paxgaming.com

    Verified by
  • Thank you for being so helpful. I plan to get a decent gaming PC in the spring of next year. By then I'll hopefully have a larger budget. Plus parts may be cheaper also.

  • my advice is to buy a PC with at least Inter I3 Processor and 4GB RAM

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  • Edit* sorry for the double post, my computer froze up on me and I submitted it twice. Oops!

  • Based on the research I've done, you can't do much with an i3, so,  i7 is the way to go for recent games. Those are quite expensive, so I'll probably stick with an i5 quad core with 4-8GB ram. A GTX 700 series GPU would be pretty sweet too.

  • yeah for the most part you dont want an i3, you very likely dont want an i7 either.  The i7s only real advantage over the i5s is hyper-threading which does nothing for gaming.  The also tend to have slightly higher clock speeds but not enough to justify the price, the extra money would be better spent on an after market cooler and then just over clock the i5.

    You also want 8 gigs of ram.  4 is just not enough for gaming, and memory is cheap.

    Then dont write off AMD CPUs.  For a budget build they tend to work very well.  Right now in terms of performance they are a good step behind the i5s.  However this is mostly because games are currently terribly optimized for multi-core use.  Right now the big advantage of AMD CPUs are they have more cores than intel CPUs (and price).  So their main advantage is countered by poor game optimization.  However with both the PS4 and X1 using AMD 8 core processors this could quickly change.  It is very likely as we move into this next generation of consoles games will become far better optimized for mulit-core use significantly improving AMDs 8 core cpu performance.  If you are not building till spring take a wait and see approach, but with AMD being the CPUs and GPUs in both the PS4 and X1 thing could very quickly swing in their favor.

    We're sorta like 7-Eleven. We're not always doing business, but we're always open.

    Steam - palor700   XBL - LooneyPilot   paxgaming.com

  • I agree, that's why I decided to wait. Well, that and the price. I think I read an article somewhere that touches on what you just mentioned. I'll have a good PC soon enough, I just have to be patient and save up a bit.

  • If you're buying a new monitor, keyboard and mouse you might have a hard time staying under $1,100. If your just getting the parts and you already have most of your peripherals then you'll easily be able to make a killer rig for under $1,100... especially if you go the AMD/ATI route instead of the Intel/Nvidia route.

    DANGER ZONE

  • If that is the case then it is better to buy new set of computer than buy new monitor, keyboards and mouse.

  • I built my gaming PC on Palor's recommendations back in 2011 and have no regrets but be prepared to spend at least $1,200 if you're starting from scratch.  I ended up $1,600 or so in the hole but mainly because I splurged on extra's I didn't need like a 3D monitor and a closed loop water cooler.  I will disagree with Palor on the AMD cpu bit, not because he is wrong but because I believe Intel will most likely produce the better CPU going forward and I wouldn't want you to invest in a Mobo that would need to be replaced should you upgrade your CPU in the future.  It may be more expensive up front ($40) but a better investment in the long haul.  Go with a i5 3570k with the LGA 1155 socket or the i5 4670k with the 1150 socket for a little more future proofing.  I recommend no less than 8GB of DDR3 Ram, 16GB if you can afford it but 8GB will suffice for the next year at least and it would be a piece of cake to upgrade later.  There is much debate on whether to choose AMD or NVDIA for your GPU based on the upcoming consoles.  PS4 and Xbox One are both using AMD architecture, which may or may not benefit rigs with AMD GPUs.  Personally, I don't think it will make a difference because it all depends on driver support from the GPU manufacturer.  Go with what will give you the best bang for you buck based on www.gpuboss.com or an equivalent website.  GPU prices are more volatile than Miley Cyrus on cocaine, so good luck with your purchase timing.    

    When I built my PC, I went to the local Microcenter and the sales reps there gave me a ton of help.  All of them had slightly differing opinions on what components to use and a vested interested in your wallet but they pointed me in the right direction.  Plus, they always give you $40 off a motherboard when purchasing any i5k or i7k Intel CPU, which priced them lower than any online retailer I found.  Definitely buy the PCGamer 2014 Spring magazine for how to build your own PC.  They release an issue every quarter and it's sold at damn near every store that sells magazines.  This issue gives you step by step directions and even parts recommendations for your build (premium, standard and budget oriented).  

    Good luck with your build!  I'm sure you will not regret it.  You will definitely make a mistake or two but that's the beauty of PC gaming, you learn as you go!

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