Getting into a game on day 730 - TOGNick Blog - www.GameInformer.com
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Getting into a game on day 730

This may come off as a bit of a rant, so I apologize in advance if it does, and it may come off as fanboyish, so again apologies for that. I've noticed something happening over the past couple of days and weeks, with Dark Souls 2 launching last week, and in the past other games have seemed to have this same kind of weird situation occur. While no doubt people have bought From Software's latest offering, I've seen at least on Twitter and Facebook, more buying the original Dark Souls, which I think is a fallacy in thought. First and foremost, while there are several nods to the events of Dark Souls, there is very little continuity, at least that I've seen from game to game, also if you're enjoying the original, why not support From Software in their latest offering instead.

The Souls games have always bordered in that middle level of AAA games, in that they come from a big publisher, get a big push at review time, and have a very devoted fan base, but to push the series into more people's hands From Software and Namco Bandai, had to spend significantly more on Dark Souls 2 then they did on Dark Souls. This was their choice, but it was also to address concerns that people had regarding the difficulty to get into certain systems in the game, as well as address several storytelling issues. In effect the disservice being done is a lack of support for the latest offering. Although with my own experience I don't think there is a lack of playing support on the user end, which is nice for late adopters, but again From Software now has dedicated servers for Dark Souls 2, which means support is needed from the community to keep those servers active.

Now the above example is just my little fanboy observation, for a game that I love, but I've seen this happen in other series as well, not the blockbusters mind you, but mid-level series such as some JRPGs and games that don't have as much hype off the bat. While I understand that some games aren't worth jumping in for sixty dollars on day one, and that when a sequel comes out the original usually ends up discounted, but the issue is one in which as we support the older titles, we then enter an area in which newer games don't make as much on the investment from the developers. Obviously some series require strict adherence to timeline to understand the plot, but at some point we have to support the new releases as well as the old ones in a companies catalog.

There are far too many publishers and developers who have essentially shoe horned the consumers into buying each new release for fear of missing on the experience, even if the plot is nonessential to your enjoyment (Call of Duty, Battlefield, The Sims, Guitar Hero, Rock Band etc.). Because if you don't then you're behind, good luck finding a full lobby, forget getting that song you wanted, the list goes on and on. We moan and complain about these games, because we want to experience the excitement and challenge, but why every year, yet when companies don't release on a yearly cycle, or in blockbuster fashion, we then ignore the new work for the old. It's a disservice to companies that treat consumers with respect and dignity, and it's a disservice to the developers who spend time and money to provide us with products that we end up enjoying, just not on release day. Next time a game comes out, and people are talking about it, please experience the newest version of said game, especially if it isn't yearly release, let's show these companies that their work is worth it, on day one instead of day 730.

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