Lara Croft Seeking Help Isn't Weakness, It's Strength - comradekoch Blog - www.GameInformer.com
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Lara Croft Seeking Help Isn't Weakness, It's Strength

When I saw the teaser trailer during Microsoft's E3 press conference for Rise of the Tomb Raider, I was excited. I thought it was one of the better game trailers I've seen in a long time. It had a great sense of momentum, a wonderful aura of suspense, and a fantastic musical score that had me excited for the future of the franchise. It helped that it was also a complete surprise.

If you haven't seen the trailer, it shows a hooded woman, later revealed to be Lara Croft, in a therapy session with an older white man. As her therapist speaks to Lara about the trauma she sustained after the events of the previous game and her mental condition, Lara can be seen visibly shaking. Her therapist worries she's fallen into a "mental trap" that she may never escape from. But there is another possibility -- Lara could become who she was meant to be.

I was impressed and excited to see Lara's return. So when I went online later that day, I was a little confused by some of the reactions I saw. Some shouted "How dare the developers make Lara Croft seek help from a man!" or highlighted the idea that Lara receiving therapy somehow made her weak. They claimed developers were once again stripping a powerful female protagonist of her strength, similar to how Metroid: Other M transformed Samus into a character completely dependent on her male supporting cast.

For me, this couldn't be further from the truth. Lara Croft is a gaming icon, though probably for all the wrong reasons. She's starred in her fair share of great action titles and a few poor ones as well, but she isn't recognized the world over because of her brains, skills, or the quality of her games. She is remembered because she is a female protagonist sporting tight shorts, a small waist, and huge breasts at a time when most gamers were still teenage boys. If you don't believe me, look no further than the above promotional image. The fact that she is a strong, independent woman is secondary to her sex appeal, at least where the old games are concerned.

I can't say I was ever a fan of the old franchise for basically that reason. So with no history with the franchise I went into the recent Tomb Raider reboot with an open mind, and what I found impressed me.Tomb Raider is by no means a perfect game, but it does plenty right. Unique puzzles, solid shooting, good platforming, beautiful scenery, great voice acting and good writing. The story left a little to be desired, but after finishing the game and putting down the controller I can safely say that my favorite part of Tomb Raider is, well, the Tomb Raider herself.

It's brilliant really. Crystal Dynamics managed to transform a character that existed first and foremost as a sex icon into a strong, smart, and believable heroine. She doesn't begin as a hardened killer or expert explorer. She starts as a very intelligent woman in a deadly situation, who is forced to rely on herself to see that she and her friends make it to safety.The Lara of the the rebooted Tomb Raider has a powerful will to endure, and a desire to protect those she cares about that allows her to do the impossible.

The trailer for Rise of the Tomb Raider looks to build upon this idea by looking at Lara and the events she survived with a level of attention rarely seen in games. On that island Lara killed for the first time, lost loved ones, suffered unimaginable pain and survived near unbearable conditions. But she survived, though surviving in the world of the new Tomb Raider, just as in the real world, doesn't mean emerging unscathed.

I've written about this before. Though by no means the only entertainment medium guilty of this, video games seem to have a knack for completely disregarding the repercussions of a life of violence. Game action heroes kill thousands of people on screen, and then act like completely regular Joes at the end of the game. As a lover of narrative, it's always been a disconnect that has bothered me.

Which is why I enjoyed the latest Tomb Raider and the new trailer for it's sequel so much. The developers look to be actually acknowledging that what Lara went through isn't normal, isn't something that you can just shrug off. It has to be overcome.

We sadly live in a society where to accept help is viewed as weak. Lara, to some, is showing weakness by seeking help in the new trailer. It is because she is a woman, some say, that the developers are choosing to show her seeking help, reinforcing an absurd idea that women aren't as strong as men and somehow butchering her character in the process. If Lara was instead a man, they say, he wouldn't seek counseling. That last bit is correct, and is exactly the problem.

I hear stories every day of veterans coming home from war who are too afraid or too ashamed to seek help for their Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Instead they bottle it up and keep it inside, often with dangerous consequences for both themselves and those around them. The truth is this -- men and women are equally weak. Nobody goes through traumatic events like seeing friends killed or killing others and is completely, 100 percent okay afterwards.

I would argue the problem is not with how Lara is being portrayed, but rather the problem rests with how our medium instead chooses to portray its stoic, white, male action heroes, men who often kill without hesitation, thought, or remorse. We don't see the men of countless military shooters struggle with survivors guilt or the loss of loved ones. We don't see action heroes like Nathan Drake think twice about killing hundreds in a quest for treasure. It's all swept under the rug, reinforcing the fantasy that men are magically stronger and better equipped to deal with the horrors of war and combat than woman and thus don't ever have a problem with it.

The fact that we do see Lara, both in the reboot and in this trailer, struggling with what she's lived through doesn't make Lara weak. It's in fact quite the opposite. It makes her stronger, much stronger than the countless, interchangeable male heroes whose developers choose to make them mentally invincible. It gives her obstacles to overcome that aren't as primitively simple as "shoot the bad man," or "blow up the base."

Seeking help isn't an act of weakness, it's an act of strength. And this new Lara Croft has it in spades.

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