The inherent risk of being a first adopter. - atomicme317 Blog - www.GameInformer.com
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The inherent risk of being a first adopter.

It's done. After having looked at the games, the features, and factoring in which ecosystem I prefer, I pre-ordered an Xbox One from Amazon. While I know that a VERY large portion of the GI community will balk, roll their eyes, or flat out just laugh, I don't think I'll be anywhere near the only person to do so.

Why would I do this? Fanboyism? Gullibility? Am I a Sony hater? In short, no. The risks involved in being a first adopter are ever present. Just ask the people who bought a PS3 day one. Arriving on the scene a year later than the competition, Sony had a huge uphill climb. But eventually, the PS3 gained traction, and despite a great deal of past (APOCOLYPS3) and present (the godawful state of system updates and the Playstation store) issues, Sony stuck it out. At this time, PS3 penetration has surpassed Xbox 360 world wide, if not in the US.

So I weighed the risk of Microsoft's abysmal messaging sinking the system entirely(unlikely but not outside the realm of possiblity), against the idea that they will push, pull, shove, and generally bulldoze their way forward with the platform. For Years to come, the Xbox One WILL have fantastic games. For years to come it will build and elaborate on all the other features that are unique to the system. I've got no problem admitting that the tech junkie in me loves all the TV and connectivity features. I use Kinect  on my 360 now for apps and movies, and a more responsive version sounds great to me.

But the risk of buying a machine that is DOA is still there. At the moment, Microsoft is seemingly doing everything it can to undermine it's new all in one entertainment box. Great games will not keep it afloat forever. Some things will likely help, like their following after Sony in giving Xbox live more value, but the offerings thus far are too old to be seen as much of a deal. I spite of all that, I'm excited. When the 360 launched, the pitfalls were nearly as potentially crippling. Thankfully, Microsoft owned up to the RRoD, and spent a billion dollars making that mistake right. If things really begin to go south with the Xbox One, I feel relatively comfortable in saying they have the money, financial stability, and general willingness to do so again.

None of the privacy questions concern me either. If the NSA is peering at me through my Kinect, they're in for a pretty boring time. The almost always online? My current consoles are always online, and I've never had an outage that lasted more than a few hours. Well, except on PS3 that is. Oh, and just to remind those of you who have forgotten, there were several things even on PS3 that were unavailable during that fiasco. After having to install Heavy rain on my PS3 before the outage, I couldn't play the game until PSN was back up and running 24 days later. It sucked but we all got through it. I can only hope Microsoft has learned from that and is prepared for such an attack on Xbox live, but again, it's a leap of faith I'm willing to take.

Yeah, it's risky. but for those of us who stick our necks out to be on the ground floor of a new console, it always has been. I'm good with that.

 

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