This past week, a friend of mine shared a song with me called "Appointments" by Julien Baker. There's a particular set of lines that stand out.

Maybe it's all gonna turn out all right.

And I know that it's not, but I have to believe that it is.

Probably not, but I have to believe that it is.

It's a curious mix of optimism and cynicism that often swings too far in either direction with most of the messages that pop culture belts out. You have the disillusioned dreamers with naive expectations and the burnt-out buzzkills who are numb to hope. However, as I've discovered in the past few years, you often find the most wisdom between the black and white, so it pays to see the gray. It is smart to hold onto your dreams and look for the best in everything. It is also important to see the world for what it is with grounded pragmatism. Whether we're talking about our goals, relationships, or general well-being, I think Baker captures the necessity of having a balanced outlook when she discussed "Appointments" on Hrishikesh Hirway's podcast SongExploder:

No matter how small the pinhole of light is, it's entirely possible that within the next day or the next week or the next month, we could feel closer to something.

That's a perspective that I - no, everyone should adopt. Be realistic, but don't let your aspirations die. Keep them alive in any way you can because they might just come to fruition right around the corner. I was in a similar situation applying to the Game Informer internship. After doing so for the third and final time, I hoped to hear back from the magazine that inspired me to pursue videogame journalism, but was ready and content to move on if need be. Not everything turns out the way you want all the time, and that's okay.

Thankfully, persistence was the last key I needed to open the door. I got in.

If you asked me what I've thought about settling in Minnesota for the past week, walking into the offices where "The World's #1 Video Game Magazine" comes together, or shaking hands with writers I've followed since I was 15, I'd tell you I'm in a dream. And I am. It just happens to have come true, and it's why I couldn't be more honored and thrilled to introduce myself as one of the latest interns alongside my colleagues Robbie Key and Jon Bowman.

That's nice and all, sure, but who am I exactly? Just to recap my bio on the staff page a bit, my interests include theology, game theory, sci-fi, and fantasy novels. Bionicle is and always will be one of my favorite franchises. I like playing piano, making videos, and ruminating over steaming cups of tea. Oh, and I love dragons. A lot.

As for videogames, my favorite genres include any kind of shooter, action-RPG, platformer,action-adventure, and stealth. If you want specific examples of the titles I love most, click here. I got my start in gaming with my father's PlayStation One and his copies of Spyro 2: Ripto's Rage! and Crash Bandicoot. He's far from a gamer and neglected these things, but they were my gateway into a lifelong hobby.

While I'm sure the lot of you wouldn't recognize me, you might if you have a history with Game Informer's online community! I got my start in writing about videogames here with reviews and my user blog from 2010 to 2015. Some of my initial work was bad. I'm still proud of some pieces I wrote. The point is that I markedly improved during this time from hours and hours of practice, which eventually encouraged me to dive headfirst into High Point University's Game and Interactive Media Design program (yes, I basically studied game theory and design academically). From there, I went on to Gardner-Webb University to get my master's degree in English.

I've also been penning news, reviews, and features for Push Square, Gamechurch, and TechRaptor since 2013. As for paying the bills, I've been working in construction and (recently) logistics as part-time jobs, but the goal is to make a career out of my endless fascination with videogames. If I can put the inspiring culture and creators surrounding them in the spotlight? If someone benefits from any sort of commentary and criticism I provide? Those two outcomes are what drive me to professionally cover one of my greatest passions.

With that in mind, I want to provide you with the most thorough yet succinct news and previews that I can muster. I aim to write as many features as possible from thought-provoking research pieces to intriguing interviews. However, since I'm always shining the shoes of intern overlords Ben Reeves and Jeff Cork, there's only so much I can do.

Outside of that, I'd also love to publish stuff on my personal blog if I'm able! Since I've committed the majority of my time to this internship for the next three months, I'll also be catching up on a good chunk of my backlog ranging from NieR: Automata to Knack 2 (baby). If I'm inspired to write up a review, think piece, or some oddball content, be sure to check back every now and then to see if I'm up to anything on the side.

You know, eight years ago, a neighbor gave me a couple 2008 Game Informer issues that he thought I'd enjoy. I subscribed the following year with my first issue containing the God of War III cover story. As the months passed, I entertained the thought of what it'd be like to write for the magazine and laughed at the impossibility. I had no interest or ambition to write in any capacity. It was a silly pipedream.

Funny how things work out sometimes.