PlayStation VR is out today, and it has the potential to bring virtual reality to a wider audience than its competition thanks to a comparatively cheaper price and the PlayStation 4's install base. We've been spending a lot of time with Sony's headset and we've gathered up all of our coverage into one convenient place.

The PlayStation VR Review
The biggest question mark for Sony's bold virtual reality vision is the hardware itself. You can find our review here where we gave a grade of C-. You can find our concluding thoughts from the review below.

PlayStation VR falls under the same argument that has plagued the ongoing war between PC gaming and console gaming for years. By the technical standards, Oculus and Vive on PC are stronger showcases for VR. However, PlayStation VR is cheaper, offers a legitimate virtual-reality experience that is more comfortable, and is easier to use than its competitors. For the console-exclusive gamers looking to enter the realm of virtual reality, PlayStation VR gets the job done. You can enter virtual worlds, get a sense that you’re really there, and have new interactive gaming experiences unlike anything you’ve seen before on consoles. You just might have a little bit of a headache as a result. - Kyle Hilliard

The Games
PlayStation VR has an impressive launch line-up, and while we haven't been able to play and review everything, you can find our impressions for some of the standout games below.

Until Dawn: Rush of Blood - 7

Rush of Blood is straightforward in its execution. It’s a simple action game that feels like an evolution of the light-gun shooter, but in this early age of virtual reality, it’s the right call. Pointing and shooting at scary things on a fun-house roller-coaster might not seem like the right direction for Until Dawn’s character-focused storytelling, but for PlayStation VR, it’s one of the best ways to get your feet wet, even if it doesn’t do anything bold or particularly innovative in the world of game design. - Kyle Hilliard

Batman: Arkham VR - 7.5

Yes, Batman: Arkham VR smacks of a proof-of-concept demo for VR, but even so, it’s a nice treat for Batman fans, and one of those experiences that you’ll want more of. - Andrew Reiner

Wayward Sky - 6.5

Wayward Sky is an entertaining adventure that never quite takes off. I enjoyed exploring the environments, but it doesn’t build on its delightfully charming world to make it memorable. It’s a good showcase for VR, where you feel immersed in its universe as you take control of several quirky machines, but the alluring concept falls flat as it never manages to be as intuitive as the world it presents. - Elise Favis

Thumper - 5.75

I enjoy challenging games when there’s a rewarding payoff. With Thumper, the reward of doing well is just more Thumper. If you’re really into the game’s bleak conceit, you may have the patience to hang with it for the duration. Personally, I was ready to leap out of the trough and never look back. - Jeff Cork

Here They Lie - 8

While the story of what happens to the main characters is unfulfilling, the descent into the hellish world of Here They Lie is, on its own, worth taking. Its dreary, evocative environments, dark tone, and horrific imagery would stand out even outside the realm of VR games. Some of its places, acts, and monsters will stick with me for a while. It creates a strong sense of place, and while I wouldn't say VR is crucial to experience, it definitely amplifies it. I may not fully get what happened during my time with Here They Lie, but I’m more than satisfied (and a little uneasy) about what I saw along the way. - Suriel Vazquez

RIGS Mechanized Combat League - 7.25

Rigs offers a mechanically simple, easy to grasp, and fun-to-play digital sports game. The nausea factor, however, absolutely has the potential to deter players. I could feel it in my stomach almost every time I dropped back into the area after being taken out, and though it did get better the more I played (with frequent breaks) it still made me pause and take a deep breath every time I put the headset on. - Kyle Hilliard

Rez Infinite Video Impressions

Rez Infinite has a new level, but is otherwise a nearly identical experience to its original release. The main difference is now you aim by looking, as opposed to moving a cursor with a control stick. VR ramps up the game's intensity, and is easier to play as a result of its updated controls. Rez released 15 years ago on PlayStation 2, but despite its age, it feels like a game that was meant for virtual reality. - Kyle Hilliard

For more of our PlayStation VR games coverage, you can also watch the archive of our two-hour live stream where we dove deep into the hardware and played a handful of games, including a full playthrough of Batman: Arkham VR.

For still more coverage of PlayStation VR, head here to take part in our reader discussion about who is planning to pick up the device today.